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No, I won't have the Christmas "Dear Jane" completed before my Guild's Show.

No, I won’t have the Christmas “Dear Jane” completed before my Guild’s Show.

‘Tis Spring (finally!) and Quilt Show Season seems to be gearing up.  My Guild has it’s show in May (almost always Mother’s Day weekend.)

I have a love/hate relationship with quilt shows.  I love seeing what other people have done, what colors and fabrics they’ve chosen to work with, what patterns or designs have inspired them to pick up needle and thread (or sit down at their sewing machine.)

Teal There Was You will have been long gone to its destination by our quilt show. *sigh*

Teal There Was You will have been long gone to its destination by our quilt show. *sigh*

I dislike displaying my own quilts. I don’t know why. It seems to me that there are other who love what I love about quilt shows and I’m not holding up my side of the bargain.

The reason I enter my Guild’s show, though, is because of something I was told my first year in the Guild: The biennial show (i.e. every other year) is basically, a hanging “show and tell.”

I like show and tell. It’s one of my favorite parts of our Guild meetings. I like the giving and receiving of feedback by applause or “oohs” and “ahhhs” (which is something you don’t get at the show.)

'Cause everyone knows the true use for quilts is to wrap your loved ones (or cats)  in warmth...

‘Cause everyone knows the true use for quilts is to wrap your loved ones (or cats) in warmth…

I also like knowing the stories behind the quilts, but many people filling out the show form don’t choose to put their stories, inspirations or even reasons for making the quilts in the “artist statement,” even though they usually do at show and tell.

Maybe it’s because they think it’s too personal, or that no one would want to read “that stuff,” but, to me, “that stuff” is almost as interesting as the quilt itself.

Anyway, I’m entering two quilts this year: A Tribute to Maryellen Hopkins (without being wrapped around Miko) and Flying in Formation (if it’s done. Right now it’s on the long arm.) And I’m agonizing over what to write about them.

What kinds of things do you want to read about the quilts you are viewing in a quilt show?

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