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My dad died a year ago on the 3rd. He was an engineer, and in his retirement, he built a database of all the bridges in Allegheny County, PA.

My dad, Malcolm Lindsay, died a year ago on the 3rd. He was an engineer, and in his retirement, he built a database of all the bridges in Allegheny County, PA. (He also tried to read everything I wrote even if he didn’t care for the genre.)

After several days of bright, clear days (but really cold ones!), December dawns.

I did finish the 50K words for NaNoWriMo this year, meaning I’m officially a winner. Yay, me! I did not, however, finish the story, so I hope to continue that at a slower pace.

I have to credit my friends on Facebook for keeping me on track (as well as those of you who were kind enough to give me stars and comments here.)

I’m not usually the most scintillating poster over there, and I’m rather afraid my “status”es seemed “much of a muchness” (ha! got that one from a thesaurus!) during the month, but a few comments and a couple of likes was all that was really needed to spur me on.

Also, a big shout-out to Mur Lafferty and her podcast “I Should Be Writing.” I had been toying with getting into writing, but more slowly… and in January. Her daily podcasts were definitely inspirational, and if you’re not of a writing mind, you may want to pick up her book, The Shambling Guild to New York City, which sounds like a hoot, and I’m hoping to get it for Christmas.

The zigzag sashing is confusing, but goes together in (sort of) diagonals.

The zigzag sashing is confusing, but goes together in (sort of) diagonals.

But now, back to December, and back to quilting.

I finished all the blocks and the half blocks for the black and white quilt (still nameless.) I am now putting it together.

I love the look of this zigzag sashing,  and I’ve done it several times, but it never seems to go together in any coherent form.

I feel I should write out the procedure, but I’m sure it would end up:

  1. Sew sashing to two opposite sides of each block.
  2. Throw blocks up in the air.
  3. As you catch them, sew them together.
  4. Repeat until the quilt is done.

Probably the most helpful advice would be to lay it out on a design wall (or floor) and sew it as you see it. It’s not for the faint of heart as it requires many (many!) partial seams.

I’ll try to get back to posting here on Thursday (and on quilting) again, and, maybe, I’ll have the center of the black and white top done… or named.

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