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Big Wheels quilt top is done.

I finally got an opportunity to take a picture of the completed Big Wheels top.

There’s been lots of construction going on around my apartment building. Today they seem to be filling the Pit of Despair (sinkhole in the parking lot) just beyond my porch. Last week it was the balconies OVER my porch.

I was able to sneak outside yesterday morning (between construction crews) and snap a  photo of the finished Big Wheels top.

It's a wonder I get any quilting done at all... Maybe I should go back to handquilting.

It’s a wonder I get any quilting done at all… Maybe I should go back to handquilting.

It’s very different from any other quilt I’ve done…light and airy where I usually use dense, saturated colors. And, I’ve actually planned for the quilting in some respects (as opposed to making the top and determining how to quilt it after, which is my usual M.O.)

The quilting will emphasize the faint green stars, and the circle patterns will almost certainly be stitched “in the ditch.” I will continue the circles in the border with quilted circles and arcs and filling patterns.

But, for now, I’m setting it aside.  All my quilts must rest, it seems, before they are quilted.

The sunflowers quilt has grown and now has a name: Sunflower Lattice.

The sunflowers quilt has grown and now has a name: Sunflower Lattice.

I’ve been working on more Sunflower blocks since last week.  Once you get used to the seams being on the bias, the block is actually quite easy.

I had planned to write the instructions, but it seems that I should include information on cutting out the pieces since not everyone knows how to work with the angles on the ruler. That part of the task is daunting. I’d rather write about the sewing.

Sunflower Lattice is actually easier than you think it is, because there are no inset seams.  The only tricky part is making sure the points meet.  In square/rectangular blocks, if you line up the seams, you can tell where the seam will cross the other seam.

I almost always pin and mark the intersections when working with 60 degree angles.

I almost always pin and mark the intersections when working with 60 degree angles.

In quilts using other angles, I end up pinning and marking the intersections.  If you were to match the seams on the edges, the points would be off because the seam is at an angle.

First I match the intersections by putting a pin vertically through both, lining up the fabric the way I want it to be sewn.

Then, I make a tiny mark on the seam allowance where this intersection is.  That way I can “aim” my sewing machine at that dot and I will be sewing in the right place.

Finally, I pin the fabric flat so that it won’t shift (if you have several seams to have to match, you want to make sure that, even if you lose the vertical pins, the fabric stays where it’s supposed to be.)

It takes a bit of practice, sewing dot to dot, but it’s much, much easier than continually ripping out your seam when you don’t get it right.

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